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Introduction of Zoo

Introduction of Zoo

In addition to having Japan's largest number of flamingoes in captivity, Miyazaki City Phoenix Zoo features such animals as the Masai Giraffe, Grant's Zebra, the Brindled Gnu, Lion, Chimpanzee, Orangutan, the Bactrian Camel, the Lesser Panda, the Formosan Sika Deer, the Indian Wood Stork and other birds, amounting to over 1,500 animals of approximately 100 species on display. There is also the very rare flamingo show and the Animal Village, where children can interact with animals. There are also several events throughout the year.

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Chilian Flamingo

Chilian Flamingo - Order Ciconiiformes/Family Phoenicopteridae
Scientific Name: Phoenicopterus chilensis
Habitat: Peru to southern Chile, southern Brazil to the mountainous salt-water lakes of Argentina.
Diet: Plankton.
Their bodies are light pink, but their feet are light gray with pink joints and webbing.
They feed their young by spitting up bright red "Flamingo milk".
The zoo's Flamingo Show features this Chilian Flamingo.

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Masai Giraffe

Masai Giraffe - Order Artiodactyla, Family Giraffidae
Scientific Name: Giraffe camelopardalis tippelskirchi
Habitat: Eastern Africa
Diet: Tree leaves
The tallest of land animals, giraffes grow to almost 5 meters in height.
The giraffe uses its approximately 45-centimeter tongue to deftly wrap around branches and tear off the leaves.
You might get of glimpse of "necking" - the characteristic behavior between male giraffes of knocking their heads against each others' bodies.

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Chimpanzee

Chimpanzee - Order Primate, Family Pongidae
Scientific Name: Pan troglodytes
Habitat: Africa
Diet: Fruit, seeds, tree leaves, flowers, fruits, resin, insects.
Chimpanzees are very good at using tools. For example, they can use thin branches to extract honey and termites, rocks to break hard tree seeds, and cloth sacks as blankets when they sleep.
When the female is ready to mate, her behind swells and becomes red as a tomato.
They have no tails.

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Orang Utan

Orang Utan - Order Primates, Family Pongidae
Scientific Name: Dongo Pygmaeus
Habitat: Borneo, Sumatra
Diet: Fruits, seeds, tree leaves, flowers, resin, insects.
Called the ape of the orient, the very word "orang utan" is Malay for "the person of the forest".
The adult male characteristics are cheeks that enlarge to the left and right and a chin that also gets so big that you cannot tell where eyes and nose are.
They use tools well, commonly making umbrellas out of tree leaves to use as shelter from the rain.

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Lesser panda

Lesser panda - Order Carnivora, Family Ursidae
Scientific Name: Ailurus fulgens styani
Habitat: Northern Burma through China
Diet: Bamboo, fruits, small animals, eggs.
They mainly live solitarily in bamboo groves.
On their fronts legs, acting as an opposing digit is a protuberance called the "sixth finger". This extra digit is not really a finger or a digit at all; it is actually a wrist bone that has changed shape. The red panda uses this protuberance with the other digits to hold things.
The female gives birth from Spring to Summer in dens laid in the hollows of trees and rocks. The female has 8 teats.

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Ostrich

Ostrich - Order Struthioniformes, Family Struthionidae
Scientific Name: Strutio camelus
Habitat: Africa
Diet: Fruits, seeds, small animals
The largest bird in the world, the ostrich cannot fly, but it can run 70-80 kilometers per hour.
Excellent eyesight enables it to distinguish enemies from 2 kilometers away.
The male ostrich warms the eggs and cares for offspring.
The eggs weigh approximately 1.5 kilograms, and they hatch after about 40 days.

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Ring-tailed lemur

Ring-tailed lemur - Order Primates, Family Lemuridae
Scientific Name: Lemur catta
Habitat: Madagascar (Indian Ocean)
Diet: Fruits, tree leaves, flower nectar.
As the name suggests, ring-tailed lemurs have white and black rings on their tails, which serve as a visual signal.
On their front legs and beneath the armpits, they have special secretion glands. They rub this secretion on things like branches to mark their territory.
They live in groups of 5 to 30 animals. They use extremely loud calls as warning signals.

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Indiann wood stork

Indiann wood stork - Order Ciconiiformes, Family Ciconiidae
Scientific Name: Ibis leucocephalus
Habitat: Southeast Asia
Diet: Fish and insects.
Living in flocks, they concentrate many nests in one area to form colonies.
With no feathers on its head and a bill that bends downward, this bird resembles an ibis, which is called toki in Japanese. As a result, the Japanese name is tokikou, or ibis stork.
Here at Miyazaki City Phoenix Zoo, we have succeeded in raising these birds in open air. They fly about freely, but we provide food habitat for them.

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Cape Penguin

Cape Penguin - Order Sphenisciformes, Family Speniscidae
Scientific Name: Spheniscus demersus
Habitat: The sea coast of southern Africa.
Diet: Fish, shrimp, and squid.
The penguin's wings have evolved into oar-shaped "flippers", which enable these sea birds to swim as though they were at play.
Penguins form husband-wife pairs and breed in large, concentrated groups. The male and female dig holes for nests and raise the young together.

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European white pelican

European white pelican - Order Pelecaniformes, Family Pelecanidae
Scientific Name: Pelecanus onorotalus
Habitat: Africa, southern Europe, southern Asia
Diet: Fish.
The largest of aquatic fowl, the pelican uses its huge beak and throat sack to catch fish.
The throat sack can hold 15 liters of water, which can also be used to regulate body temperature.
Pelicans live in flocks of 5 to 10 birds. They cooperate in catching fish.

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Grant's Zebura

Grant's Zebura - Order Equidae, Family Equus grevyi
Scientific Name: Equus burchelli bohmi
Habitat: The grassy plains of eastern Africa.
Diet: Grass and tree leaves.
Living in herds with gnu and ostriches, these zebras move seasonally with the gnu.
Each zebra's stripes are different, and though this pattern might seem conspicuous or even gawdy, in the plains of Africa, these strips serve as protective coloration, making the animals hard to find or detect.

- It introduces a part of animal.